March

For those of you keeping score, I did not offer a seminar this year.

I lectured at four or five seminars put on by other people… but there’s a huge difference between what I can do with a typical 90-minute slot at a crowded event… and what I have accomplished in the two past seminars I put on all by my lonesome.

When I hold a seminar, it’s just me and the audience, for two or three days. No other speakers, zero product pitching, no distractions at all.

Just hard-core teaching. The kind of hands-on, in-your-face, explosive-learning-curve teaching that can change your life.

I like to roll up my sleeves and get to work. The first event I held was the Copywriting Sweatshop, and I tore into the copy of every attendee, personally and in front of everybody. At the second event, The License To Steal seminar, I showed everyone exactly how to take proven ads and letters… and quickly turn them into your own vicious profit-makers.

Sometimes, it’s all about the shortcuts.

That’s been it, however. I’ve offered my courses and critiques and other materials for almost five years now… and there are just those two seminars.

And because I did so much personal work with each attendee, I was forced to severely limit the number of people who got in. I turned down a number of people who thought they could bribe their way in after the last seat was sold. Turning them down was necessary, but it was also good practice.

You know you’re in the groove when you can say “no” to someone waving thousands of dollars in your face without even considering caving in.

And, as much as I enjoyed the look of astonishment on their faces — you’d be surprised how often people actually get (and expect) special treatment just by throwing money around — it was simply a matter of limitations. If I were just yapping away about theory and concepts and bullshit like that, I could let everyone in who wanted a seat.

But that’s not what I do.

There’s a place for lecturing and theory and stroking the dreams of avarice… but there’s also a need for real meat. And there’s precious little of that at most events.

So I try to fill the gaps. I don’t want passive attendees. I like to make you sweat, and even work a bit — it’s the only way to actually learn, and the best way to retain new skills.

By doing. Not just listening and twiddlig your thumbs.

Anyway, after a full year off, I’m getting itchy again to hold another brutal learning seminar. There’s no thrill on earth like watching raw rookies finally have that “a-ha!” experience that opens up the vaults for them… or like watching the smug grin fade on the know-it-alls when they finally realize they’ve been cheating themselves all along, and (a-ha, again) they can start to taste the fortune waiting for them when they get back to the office and put what they’ve discovered to work.

That’s what makes teaching such a kick. The transformation from “whaaaa?” to “Ah, now I get it!”

I’m looking at March right now. Here in Reno. Won’t be cheap. Will be worth it.

I’m also already planning it out. Won’t be like anything else you’ve ever seen before. As generous as I am in revealing everything I know about writing killer advertising… and I defy you to find another teacher who shares as freely and deeply as I do… there’s still only so much I can do without locking eyes with you to make sure you “get” it.

Over the years, I’ve trained and mentored a vast parade of writers. But it’s ones who score a little personal time and targeted advice who do the best.

And I don’t have to tell you what being one of the “best” writers entitles you to, do I?

Let’s just say the wealth potential will buckle your knees.

The problem, of course, has always been getting that personal access. I simply do not have the time to mentor anyone one-on-one any more.

So that leaves these super-rare, “just me and you in a room” occasionaly seminars as the only time you’ll ever get this kind of “forced growth” attention.

I have no other details for you at this time. I cannot accept reservations yet, even.

Just consider this a shot across your bow. Early warning. It will sell out, fast. So, if you are at all inclined to even consider attending… don’t commit to anything else in March yet.

For the few who get in, it will launch the new year like a howitzer. No matter what other high tech gimmicks or tricks you use… your bottom line will always rest on your copy.

All-the-bells-and-whistles site, with bad copy… equals miserable results.

Basic, stripped-down site, with killer copy… equals massive sales, in any market.

Nothing happens until the copy gets written. All the techno-bling-whiz-bang available won’t do your selling for you. It takes copy.

And once you learn — really get-your-hands-dirty learn – the inside secrets of the best, the cash pipeline just bursts open.

Something to think about, don’t you think?

Stay frosty,

John Carlton
www.marketingrebel.com

3 Responses to March

  1. John,

    I wouldn’t miss this for the world!

    I know how valuable your advice is in email format. I can’t imagine how much better it will be in person, but you know, I’M GONNA FIND OUT!

Leave a reply


All testimonials and case studies within this website are, to the best of our ability to determine, true and accurate. They were provided willingly, without any compensation offered in return.

These testimonials and case studies do not represent typical or average results. Most customers do not contact me or offer share to their results, nor are they required or expected to. Therefore, I have no way to determine what typical or average results might have been.

Many people do not implement anything I teach them. I can't make anyone follow my advice, and I obviously can't promise that our advice, as interpreted and implemented by everyone, is going to achieve for everyone the kinds of results it's helped some of the folks you read about and hear from here achieve.

The income statements and examples on this website are not intended to represent or guarantee that everyone will achieve the same results. Each individual's success will be determined by his or her desire, dedication, marketing background, product, effort, and motivation to work and follow recommendations. There is no guarantee you will duplicate results stated here. You recognize any business endeavor has inherent risk for loss of capital.

© 2004-2014 John Carlton. All rights reserved.